Building the LES

This Saturday my class will be in the Lower East Side holding a visioning session with whoever is interested, asking participants to let their imaginations run wild and explore how they'd picture their ideal neighborhood.

The class is led by James Rojas, an artist and planner who developed this technique. Colorful blocks, shapes, and miscellaneous bits and pieces get moved around an abstracted map of the neighborhood, freeing participants from anxiety about practicality, vocabulary, or the legitimacy of their viewpoint. By making the process fun, people tend to exercise more creative thinking and give their visions power.

Plan Manhattan Family Friendly Activity!
Date: Saturday July 28, 2012
Time:  3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Location: First Park @ 33 East 1st Street
For more information go to www.firststreetgreenpark.org

 Our (nearly) finished basemap of the Lower East Side

Our (nearly) finished basemap of the Lower East Side

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AuthorChris Hamby
Categoriesplanning

I was looking through the New York State Department of Transportation's environmental design guidelines when I came across the Hudson Valley region's special pilot guidelines on deer composting. With a growing deer population and increasing congestion, disposal of roadkill has become a pressing logistical problem (local rendering plants are apparently also shutting down). The solution is to simply dump the deer carcasses into a compost bin and use the compost a few months later on DOT right of ways. It's a fascinating document, and I'm now keyed in to a growing national trend

Posted
AuthorChris Hamby

Currently reading environmental impact statement documents for the Oak Point Link, and mummichogs repeatedly came up. One of the hardiest fish species in the northeastern United States, mummichogs may be the only fish species present in heavily polluted waters. 

The reports I'm reading hold out little hope for the Harlem River (it's amazing how much differently we perceive our urban waterways today) and point to the abundance of mummichog in its waters as a symptom of its highly degraded nature.

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AuthorChris Hamby

A severe case of jet lag (I was more or less asleep by 3pm) prevented me from attending, but we got the opportunity to present our project to the Harlem River community this Monday, June 11th.

From what I heard it was a great success, and we got a writeup in the Mott Haven Herald.

For posterity's sake, I posted the video I created and was planning on narrating below. It gives a rough overview of the current state of the Harlem River, as well as some of the numerous proposals developed over the years for the site. There should be a more polished publication coming out sometime this summer. Stay tuned.

 

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AuthorChris Hamby